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What makes for Political Stability? -I

{ In renewed context of Telangana issue }

Many people are quite appalled at the present political crises in AP & quite a few no. of other states are against it, as any lenience in this aspect might soon crumble their own states wherein the demand for separation have freshly arisen.

First & foremost before taking any particular stand I feel that political stability is doesn't necessarily translate into development. Development doesn't necessarily imply skyscrapers, concrete forests & hi-tech roads with sophisticated gadgetry. On the contrary, political stability is not of any value if the fruits of development don't reach the majority of population. Furthermore, if its not based on a foundation of social & economic justice, stability infact sharpens the lines between haves & have-nots. Also the needs of majority (who're poor/middle class) are to prioritized adequately for continual peace and any complacence in this regard is the road to strife.

In absence of balanced development such events will reoccur with more frequency, and any suppression will only metamorph to a stronger resurgence as seen in Telangana. Now, I'm not in complete favour of Telangana but nonetheless I concede that I can see no better way for Telanganas to receive justice & see a satisfactory harmonic conclusion. Quite ambiguous stand, you say? Well, I'll try to present facts in essence stripped of all interpretations first & shall thereafter get into subjective analysis.

1.) I think one who has read any material concerning Telangana issue that it has been victim of gross negligence ( read sujaiblog.blogspot.com for an intensely single-point agenda driven analysis which should convince anyone that Telangana was indeed victimized )
2.) Andhra Pradesh Govt (in 1956) agreed to implement certain rules & safeguards which were safely flouted later on. Had they never accepted them, it would have been another issue. But going back on the promise(similar to present situation) has certainly shaken the faith of Telangana people in the goodwill of AP Govt.
3.) Having gone through difficult experiences, its now widely believed that they can't be at the mercy of the goodwill of forces that are not obliged/compelled to act in accordance with the agreed proposals. Its not a nice position to dependent on others who have no legal/political obligation to act in a certain manner & their charitable goodwill alone being the key to solution. (Andhra+Seema enjoy political majority to overturn/veto any decision.)
4.) The state is sharply polarised into 2 camps. Make no mistake about that. I stay in Hyd'bad & I'm yet to come across a person of Telangana who's not supportive of Telangana issue. This is irrespective of their caste/status/profession & every creed. Even IT professionals who're supposed to lead a luxurious life sans of any political interests are quite passionate about this.


These are some facts whose intricate details would be made visible to any keen observer. Also there are some other related issues which don't form the mainstream current but are quite apparent. One is regarding the depreciation of Telangana culture/language by AP filmdom & print media. Here again, I feel that aesthetics & beauty are subjective in nature, that any unfamiliar object generally generates aversion. I'm no expert in any language, but I feel that in an age when English language is being ruthlessly mismanaged through Twitters & SMSs, there's no harm if certain sect of people feel it worthy to communicate in a certain way.

These are strong reasons why I feel that Telangana cause must be respected, because an overwhelming majority of population in Telangana region feel that they must be independent. If anyone discredits the movement & the causes behind it, then there can be no headway in the peace process.

What I'm more concerned about are certain other factors which need to be discussed & which calls for more flexibility among both camps and also shedding their idealogical baggage for a more pragmatic approach to solve the problem.

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